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5

Into the Night

Quick Overview

Gina Love
Into the Night
2017,
Acrylic, Ink, Mixed Media Canvas
24x35.8in

$1,104

Availability: In stock

Details

Gina Love
Into the Night
2017,
Acrylic, Ink, Mixed Media Canvas
24x35.8in

About the piece
The painting is part of a body of work exploring the psychological theory the ‘Tyranny of the Should’. Gina's interpretation of theory she discovered in therpay evoked a whole new body of work and fascination with the subject matter, and the development of a cognitive aesthetic. She became fascinated with the power and connotations of the aesthetic image.

About the artist
Gina Love is a British Artist, who’s painting practice currently responds to the emotional impact of physical and aesthetic surfaces and environments. She is fascinated with the perception of the aesthetic image, be it authentic or inventive. She is influenced by rebellion, anxiety, memories, visions and repetitive thought patterns. Her interpretation of these themes in the wider sense are replicated in the interaction of layers of paint, and contrasting heavy textures within her paintings. Gina’s Statement Growing up I was always told I was ugly. I was picked on for being quiet, being creative, called fat and teased for having red hair. I was never good enough. This caused me to look at the world in another way, to really take in my surroundings and question how my aesthetic could find a place in this world. I found peace in nature, away from noise, photography, drawing and tried to make people laugh. One of the calmest places I loved spending time was the beach, and it was here I first started taking photos of stones marked by the sea, decayed wood and rusted objects. I found beauty in these unassuming, forgotten objects, finding affinity with their imperfections and wanted to explore their unique characteristics. I fell into a deep depression growing up because of everything that had happened and my practice started by painting over photos, and writing to process thoughts. I then started to experiment with free- flow drawing, and was completely fascinated by both the intuitive subconscious lines which I produced, and the calming effect this process had on me. There were no rules with the way the lines went, no rules about the shapes which came out. The density of the lines replicated my thought patterns, so I developed the concept of a cognitive aesthetic and visual conflicts. I decided to paint one of the drawings I had done and completely loved the process. I found myself entering a completely calm, trance like state. My practice has progressed in that I don’t always start with the intention of replicating a drawing. I sometimes start with a vision, a colour obsession, an emotion. I want to feel free when I paint, and having an open mind when starting a painting allows complete intuitive freedom with spontaneous brushstrokes, colour mixing and instinctive impasto application. My favourite thing about the method, is that, the forced introversion of complex thought patterns, becomes interpreted and confronted in the finished piece. The names of my paintings are sometimes reflective of the thought processes that influence the evolution of the piece. I want to send the viewer to another place with my work, I want to evoke curiosity, I want people to study the texture of my work and want to touch it. I want to represent my imagination.

Additional Information

Dealer

GINA LOVE



Gina Love is a British Artist, who’s painting practice currently responds to the emotional impact of physical and aesthetic surfaces and environments. She is fascinated with the perception of the aesthetic image, be it authentic or inventive. She is influenced by rebellion, anxiety, memories, visions and repetitive thought patterns. Her interpretation of these themes in the wider sense are replicated in the interaction of layers of paint, and contrasting heavy textures within her paintings. Gina’s Statement Growing up I was always told I was ugly. I was picked on for being quiet, being creative, called fat and teased for having red hair. I was never good enough. This caused me to look at the world in another way, to really take in my surroundings and question how my aesthetic could find a place in this world. I found peace in nature, away from noise, photography, drawing and tried to make people laugh. One of the calmest places I loved spending time was the beach, and it was here I first started taking photos of stones marked by the sea, decayed wood and rusted objects. I found beauty in these unassuming, forgotten objects, finding affinity with their imperfections and wanted to explore their unique characteristics. I fell into a deep depression growing up because of everything that had happened and my practice started by painting over photos, and writing to process thoughts. I then started to experiment with free- flow drawing, and was completely fascinated by both the intuitive subconscious lines which I produced, and the calming effect this process had on me. There were no rules with the way the lines went, no rules about the shapes which came out. The density of the lines replicated my thought patterns, so I developed the concept of a cognitive aesthetic and visual conflicts. I decided to paint one of the drawings I had done and completely loved the process. I found myself entering a completely calm, trance like state. My practice has progressed in that I don’t always start with the intention of replicating a drawing. I sometimes start with a vision, a colour obsession, an emotion. I want to feel free when I paint, and having an open mind when starting a painting allows complete intuitive freedom with spontaneous brushstrokes, colour mixing and instinctive impasto application. My favourite thing about the method, is that, the forced introversion of complex thought patterns, becomes interpreted and confronted in the finished piece. The names of my paintings are sometimes reflective of the thought processes that influence the evolution of the piece. I want to send the viewer to another place with my work, I want to evoke curiosity, I want people to study the texture of my work and want to touch it. I want to represent my imagination.